Red Traditions Archive

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Red Food parenthesis: Beetroot Cured Salmon

I would like to make a ‘red food parenthesis’ in my posts and share one of my favorite Russian-cuisine-inspired recipes of Beetroot Cured Salmon. It can be served as appetizer or as a main course. Beetroot gives salmon a slightly sweetened taste and adds a unusual red color, making it look appetizing and elegant. Ingredients: 800 gr Salmon filet, skin on 50 gr of Extra Large Sea salt 50 gr of Sugar Sliced beetroot Dill (optional) Steps to make it: Mix Extra Large Salt and Sugar together Lay Salmon Skin down and cut Filet in two halfs Sprinkle Salmon with salt and sugar Cver one of the filets with beetroot and fill Sandwich two filets together Wrap in aluminium foil or in plastic wrap Put in a dish and cover with something heavy which weighs around a pound or more Refrigerate for 12 hours or mre (It can be 24h depending on your taste) Discard accumulated juice, beetroot and dill Slice thinly without the skin, serve with bread, sprinkled with lemon juice Bon appetit!

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The Thirst to Become

The Thirst to Become – food for thought during confinement. Few people know the ‘Russian Socrates’, the Georgian philosopher Merab Mamardashvili (1930-1990). Merab was born in Gori, Georgia. He called his teaching ‘Socratic’ in the sense that it was composed of dialogues. In his life only a few books were published, his lectures (for his style of lecturing he and others called them “conversations” or “dialogues”) were taped and published after his death. One of his teachings focused on the thought that life was in the self-realization and “in fulfillment of oneself as a human being”, that is the fulfillment of the possibilities of one’s character or personality. Some of the most known phrases coined by Mamardashvili are: “consciousness is an experience of inexperiensible experiences”, “phenomenology is the accompanying feature of all the philosophy”, “loneliness is my profession” and so on. I recently came across a short video in which Mamardashvili tells about the Thirst to Become, and about the self-realization “What have I undertaken in order to be born in thought, to become a human being?” which I found particularly interesting during this long period of confinement To watch the video the Thirst to become with English sub-titles

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The Gourji Red Fashion Collection

Gourji – is a new Russian brand on the luxury goods market. It is unique and has no analogues. The philosophy and style of the Gourji brand are inextricably linked with the history of Russia. The brand takes a fresh look at the Eurasian cultural and historical context in which Russia is a melting pot of hundreds of cultures. The basic idea of ​​the Gourji brand – is to identify the brightest features of the artistic heritage of the past and present it in a contemporary way. The initiator of the project Dmitri Gourji – “a man of the world”, toured dozens of countries. An intellectual and romantic, a successful businessman, a collector, a man of varied interests. His passion about the country’s history and theories of the Eurasian states, Eurasian culture has prompted the idea of creating his own brand. “No matter what was the ideology of the country,” Dmitri explained to me during our meeting, “each epoch left behind its art and literature which are a part of our history and which we should not forget. It is what I call ‘a business card of the epoch.’ What’s important,” he continued sipping his coffee, “is not to forget this history and learn from it.” The Pen ‘Above the Saviour Tower’ evokes the main tower on the eastern wall of the  Kremlin which overlooks Red Square. Build in 1491 it was once the main enrance into the Kremlin. The earrings ‘Red Stars‘ (18K white gold & 12 rubies) bring […]

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My Mother Paola Volkova -Unpublished Mother Loss Memoir

To see the previous post My Mother Paola Volkova -Unpublished Mother Loss Memoir Part 2 May 3, 2013 The first few months after your death I spent in a fog. I did not notice the people around me. I stopped wearing a watch. Time had no meaning. All I knew was when the alarm went off in the morning, I had to get up to go to work. The clock on the PC in my office informed me that it was time to go back home. At work I forced myself to note down urgent tasks to do for the day and made myself do them. Otherwise I could easily spend the entire day surrounded by a fog, a thick white smoke. I saw nothing beyond it. Back home in the evening, I bought cold chicken and readymade salads for dinner until my husband politely pointed out to me that we had been eating the same food every day for the last few weeks. May 21, 2013 I’m jealous when I see mothers with their daughters on the streets. It makes me think that I will never be able to go with you for a coffee or a movie. Help you to sit down or put your coat on. I also think how happy they must be together. June 18, 2013 When I have first realized that I could not remember your face, I was so embarrassed that I could not admit it even to myself. I could remember your […]

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My Mother Paola Volkova -Unpublished Mother Loss Memoir

To see the previous post My Mother : Paola Volkova – Unpublished Mother Loss Memoir  Part 1 March 4, 2013 On Monday evening, the day you were taken to the Izmailovo Hospital, my brother called me on Skype. He said I should come to Moscow. My husband and I were on vacation in Ostend, a Northern Coast Sea resort in Belgium. “Are you sure?” I asked. You had just returned from Rome. In a few days you planned to come to see me in Paris. “Yes,” he answered laconically and nodded his head as if to make sure that I would understand him. The next morning I headed to the Ostend train station. It was mid-March. Europe had registered a record snowfall. Trains had practically ceased to work in Belgium. The departure information board announced cancelations through the end of the day. I could not leave on Tuesday The usual 2 3/4 hour trip to Paris became an impossible journey. Hoping to get to Paris by Wednesday evening, I tried to book a Thursday flight to go to Moscow. But the travel-booking web-site Opodo demanded the number and date of issue of my Russian passport. That was at home in Paris. So the ticket reservation had to be postponed until my arrival in Paris. March 6, 2013 First thing on Wednesday morning I went back to the Ostend train station and bought tickets to Paris. The clerk at the station advised that we leave as quickly as possible. “There is too […]

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All Saints’ Day in Russia – the Red Way

1.11.2013 Posted in Red Traditions No Comments

November 1 is a national holiday in  most of the countries in Europe. It is the day when many go to the cemeteries to visit the tombs of their departed relatives. In the Russian Orthodox religion we have few such days in spring and summer. They follow the religious calendar and usually fall on a Saturday. To reconcile the  need to visit the tomb of a deceased relative at least once a year with the demands of everyday life, decades of neglecting the religion and the discomfort of being outside in such a cold climate, Russians go to the cemeteries at the beginning of May. Late Spring is the best time for this kind of visit after a long winter, during which the cemeteries are covered with heaps of snow and are often inaccessible. So at the beginning of May, with its first rays of the sun, visitors bring flowers to the tombs and  have … an improvised pic- nic to honor  their ancestors – a glass of vodka with a small appetizer, zakuski – marinated cucumbers, hard cheese or hard boiled eggs. Because the first visit of the year often takes place after Easter, people leave Easter-related items on the tombs, such as colored Orthodox Easter eggs, blinis and why not – another glass of vodka for their departed relatives. The best- known cemetery in Moscow is Novodevichie. It contains the tombs of famous people and some impressive monuments. One of the most visited tombs is that of the […]